Sunday, December 17, 2017

Your Habits Will Determine Your Future

August 22, 2014 by  
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We all have dreams, desires, goals and it’s great to daydream about what it would be like holding that title belt high in the air feeling the energy of the crowd cheering you on. Back to reality now and here’s a question for you. How much time do you put into a day to make that dream come true? The time you spend training or doing something productive to get closer to your goal or dream, compared to sitting on your couch watching TV.

Don’t get me wrong daydreaming can be productive if you know how to creatively visualize. Realize that your habits will determine your future. Successful people have successful habits, unsuccessful people don’t. To get your dream to materialize you need a plan to structure your time into productive slots. All successful people have a plan, follow it, and gauge their progress by it.

Work towards making the majority of your time being productive towards your goal, i.e. training and conditioning, read and view material that is going to help you become a better fighter such as viewing video of your fights and your opponents to see what you need to work on.

IT’S ALL ABOUT WERE YOU PUT YOUR FOCUS

Ninety percent of your focus and energy should be directed at your fight plan and career if you want to succeed in the MMA world or in any goal in life. Instead of coming home from a long day at work kicking back with a beer and watching the game, put on an instructional dvd to help you learn new techniques or improve on your speed or power.

Go to the gym left weights, do cardio, strength train or work on techniques with your sparring partner. During work or on your way home visualize yourself in a match performing a technique you have recently learned, so it becomes ingrained in your subconscious and is in your arsenal. Build on your strengths, not on your weakness.

There are three kinds of people, people that make things happen, people that watch things happen and people who say what just happened. Which one are you? So if you keep asking yourself why your fight career isn’t happening take an honest inventory of yourself because it’s about were we put the focus in our life that determines were we are going.

If you keep on doing what you always done you’ll keep getting what you always got. Making your dreams become reality is not about luck, or “if it’s meant to be it will happen”. It’s not hocus-pocus; it’s all about were you put your focus.

Wing Chun – Chinese Martial Art

August 22, 2014 by  
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Wing Chun (also known as Wing Tsun, Ving Chun or Ving Tsun) is one of the most popular types of Chinese martial arts. Though it’s basically an unarmed combat technique, Wing Chun may include weapons as part of its course. The origin of Wing Chun can be traced back to China, but the real history of its creation has long been a topic of much debate. The most credible suggestion regarding the origin of Wing Chun dates back to 1700 AD in the Henan Shaolin Monastery.

When the Qing forces raided and ravaged the Southern Shaolin temple, a nun named Ng Mui fled to the distant Daliang Mountains, the only survivor. Ng Mui already had knowledge of Kung Fu in the Shaolin temple, which she assimilated with a new form she had learnt while observing a battle between a snake and a crane. She taught this new combat style to her adopted daughter whom she named Yimm Wing Chun. The new system was refined and then passed on from generation to generation, and was eventually named Wing Chun, after Yimm.

The modernization of Wing Chun started in Hong Kong during the 1950s under a Grandmaster called Yip Man. The discipline began to gain real popularity in Asia and the West when actor Bruce Lee became one of the most famous Wing Chun practitioners.

The Concept of Wing Chun:

Wing Chun is based on three basic principles – Practicality, Efficiency and Economy of Movement.

1. Practicality: Techniques such as Palm-up Hand (tan sau), Wing Arm (bong sau), Slapping Hand (pak sau) are designed to maim the most sensitive or vulnerable parts of the opponent’s body such as throat, groin, eyes and lower torso. Many movements and techniques in Wing Chun are often meant to be fatal.

2. Efficiency: Wing Chun does not use force against force, in order to gain the most efficient manipulation of the body’s energy. It believes in accurately timed and appropriately positioned little movements, and counter-attack is based on the opponent’s own force. This concept is also called Contact Reflexes.

3. Economy of Movement: This is a linear concept in which movements are based on an imaginary pole running vertically through the center of the body. The Center Line spreads out from this Mother Line, and since most of the vital points of the body are located along the Center Line, many offensive and defensive movements are based on this line. The Central Line, on the other hand, is the shortest path between the fighters where most of the combat exchanges take place.

Wing Chun Forms:

There are three basic forms in Wing Chun:

1. Empty Hand Form: This form has three more sub-forms – Siu Nim Tao – the foundation of the art, Chum Kiu – focus on advanced footwork and entry techniques, and Biu Jee – extreme short-range or long-range techniques, low kicks and sweeps, and emergency techniques.

2. Weapon Forms: The Dragon Pole and Butterfly Swords are the two forms of weapons incorporated in Wing Chun, categorized under advanced training.

3. Wooden Dummy or the Muk Yan Jong Form: A dummy made from several wooden posts represents a human opponent. The contraption is used to perfect angle, position, and footwork.

When the World Turns VIOLENT!

August 22, 2014 by  
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ITS DANGEROUS OUT THERE

Its dangerous out there and especially for you..

The enemy may be next door and you dont know it but you got to have the guts too look. What can you really do once you see some violence or get scared or worse because you receive a bashing or king hit – do you hide in your house?

The danger today is maybe not too obvious to you but you better hone your sensors or youll get hit without seeing it coming.

You know that given a situation to be a hero and stop a crime, terrorism or violence you’ll be able to step up or chase after them etc – or maybe you’ll cower or be the victim.

TV today scares the shiit out of many people as it promotes violence and turns the meek yellow and nervous.

Were are you on the scared meter of life? Are you out there amongst it or a bit of a shy body or house mummys boy?

PHYSICAL COMPETANCE

Have you ever seen raw bloodlust or someone getting ‘owned’? Just search google for “martial street fights” – “martial owned” Watch those movies and cringe!!!

Kung Fu, Boxing, dancing, balley, incompetance? What will you display to your attacker?

Today we are lazy, probably fat too.. Go look in the mirror and skip for ten minutes, then check your image again and what do you see?

I can judge I am probably half the strength and endurance form 10 years ago, how about you?

Can you throw a punch or even stand steady on one leg? can you do a round-house or even give a kick to the knee? Ever heard of a combination?

MARTIAL KNOWLEDGE

a martial art is defined as – 1 : of, relating to, or suited for war or a warrior 2 : relating to an army or to military life 3 : experienced in or inclined to war : WARLIKE

a martial art is defined as: various forms of self-defense, usually weaponless, based on techniques developed in ancient China, India, and Tibet.

If you’ve never studied a martial art, your awareness of them most likely starts at Bruce Lee movies and ends with the stylized theatrics of The Matrix. If that’s the case, you may not realize from what you’ve gleaned onscreen that there are an estimated 200 unique kinds of martial arts, and within these, thousands of different styles. Karate, judo, kung fu, and tae kwon do are among the most popular and well-known of the martial arts in the U.S., but there are numerous others.

Despite the array of martial arts and styles, most of them share common techniques, and so they can be organized into broad categories that facilitate understanding. The primary way of classifying martial arts is by the basic physical technique they use: striking or grappling.

Do you even know the diffference between kung fu and karate? Do you think wing chun is a chinese dish?

Or a combination of triangles with small circles as can be seen in chinese trapping, wrist locks or Aikido entry and endings.

Because karate, judo, kung fu, and tae kwon do have been more prominent than other forms in popular culture, from film to sporting events, many people mistakenly believe that all martial arts are Asian in origin. In fact, diverse cultures throughout history from Europe, Africa, the Americas, and the Middle East have also given birth to their own martial art forms.

The different styles can even be related to shapes or geometry – squares, triangles and circles.

MARTIAL TRAINING TO LIVE

Training is hard..really hard. The most hard is to get started and its down-hill easy from there. What you need is a martial arts machine – something new and exciting to get you off your fat ass.

Everyone knows someone who knows how to fight – with fists, knives, weapons, guns, tactical, sensless, whatever but START!

Whats important now is to do something, start with brief excercise, get into stretching, shadow box, then step up and train hard.

GO to the local phone book and look up kung fu or karate. Then give them a call, go along or take your kid.

CONCLUSION IS ACTION

Life is not scarey but maybe your lack of skill, self confidence and personal competance is making you afraid.

Be pro-active and look, then choose and participate in action whether alone with a martial arts training machine or go to a dojo.

If you are not liking what you see in the mirror, afraid to go down a dark street, scared of a potential confrontation then train now.

We cant all be Bruce Lee but you also dont want to be an emotional and physical punching bag do you?

Be pro-active and look, then choose and participate in action whether alone with a martial arts training machine or go to a dojo.

Life is not scarey but maybe your lack of skill, self confidence and personal competance is making you afraid.

What truely is a martial art?

August 22, 2014 by  
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A martial art is identified as any skill that is usefull within warfare. The definition of martial means “military.” So traditionally, a martial art is a military art. The first things that usually pop into your head when discussing modern fighting systems do you think leaping, kicking, punching, blocking, inverting elbows, twisting necks, throwing, and weapons combat. But also horsemanship, javelin throwing, archery, spear fighting, halberd fighting, wrestling, knife fighting, rifle, shotgun, and pistol shooting, demolitions, logistics, and battle strategy can all be classified within as the field of martial arts. Anything that a soldier might do in battle is a martial art.

By martial art usually it is meant aikido, arnis, boxing, capoeria, chow gar, choy la fut, hapkido, hsing’i, hun gar, jeet kune do, jow gar, judo, jujitsu, karate, kempo, kick boxing, krav maga, kung fu, pa kua, penjak silat, praying mantis, savate, shaolin, tae kwon do, tai chi, white crane, ving tsun, wu shu and more! As you can see the list is quite long and it is actually very promising how many combat arts systems there are and how many methods of self defense can be formulated.

The best style out there for you is the style that helps you achieve the product you have set for yourself, and that advances you to take your skills up a level. If that means full contact training, then you need styles that can give you that.

Often within a martial arts school it is taught that ‘this style is the best system and it was created to beat all the others’. Of course every martial artist would have the viewpoint their style is the best because that is the style they have chosen to do, but in reality what they are saying is ‘this is the best style for me as it suits myattitude and I like the teaching environment’.

There is a ongoing joke in the martial arts, that basically says when someone says theirs is the best style, what they really mean is “I study X”. Have an open mind and open eyes, and you will find the style or styles that best fit your needs.

The changing of the arts

During the period of this history and development of the martial arts and all the combat systems of man our training tools have been instrumental in evolving and perfecting these fighting systems.

All the martial arts have been altered due to the function that mechanical devices play whether it be weapons, dojo mats, breaking boards or even the uniforms we wear – all these paraphanialia indentify the martial arts into their systems and style.

The main players in shaping our new martial arts would surely be the non-contemporary wooden dummy, ving tsun rings, iron palm ointments and even the system of using forms and karta have developed the martial arts into their current form.

Even today modern training tools are common and again the martial arts are evolving and growing with new training products such as the Wavemaster, the BOB training dummy, the Focus Master. All with a common idea, to create a well rounded combat system.

Ideally a martial arts solo training tool definately has to be workable for all and based on great background ideals and through constant drilling develop into sound physical application. The ideology and theory would have to take into account all the history of the combat technology of man and give this competition and street application.

Martialarm Combat arts Kung Fu is a total control system made up of scientific body weapons with unrivaled effectiveness in both attacks and defense. Formula Fighting allows a unrivaled set up for attack and defense – a much faster system of fighting than the conventional ‘wait until they move response’ defenses. Formula fighting correctly applied is so far above current combat systems technology to evolve into a martial science so to set new standards.

# The system includes:
# Smart error ideas and selective targeting
# Meridian points and internal shock strikes
# Multi-functional and military applications
# Broken Rhythm or plyometric applications
# Chi-Sau and automatic reflex systems
# Hidden weapons and clasifications
# One arm combat strategies
# Fire and forget formulas
# Inertia breaking
# Delivery zones
# etc

Martial Arts Modern Warfare

Chinese fighting systems especially are renowned for the wide variety of their hand techniques. Most Kung-Fu styles use a good variation of hand/arm weapons (such as claws, gouges, palms, backhands, punches, backfists, hammerfists, forearm, elbows and shoulder strikes) than their Japanese, Okinawan and Korean counter?parts.

In addition to the actual number of natural body weapons used there is also a tremendous range of different applic?ations due to the regionalised development of Kung Fu styles and the different approaches taken by hard or internal/external styles.

In this analogy, the legs are used as the body’s heavy artillery, while the hands are the body’s infantry. In a military en?counter, it is common to use first satelite technology to view the opponents attack and defense cababilities and then use long distance stealth artillery to soften up the enemy and to provide a moving cover behind which the infantry can advance to seize and hold disputed territory. Without the benefit of the artillery, the infantry would take heavy casual?ties.

However, artillery with nothing else cannot seize and hold territory – a major bom?bardment may drive the enemy out. So it is with arm and leg techniques – we often use our legs to soften up the opponent and to enable us to bridge the gap until we can close in and finish the fight with hand/arm techniques and the proper use and co-ordination of hand/arm and leg techniques is often crucial to success/ survival.

We espouse a combination approach which uses hand/leg attacks from different angles of attack and at various target levels. The concept is tomaintain a flow of offensive techniques moving into an opponent’s target zones from different angles and at different levels, in order to disorientate him/her completely. We believe that this position is superior tactically to reliance upon one or two heavily committed techniques.

Martialarm Scientific Training For Speed

#1. Beginning of action

a. You must start in a positive delivery zone otherwise a negative zone can either injure your body parts or work against the intended action and become counter productive. (Newtons 1st law of motion)

b. Create an inertia breaker, a movement that will help you overcome the inertia (resistence to motion due to gravity and friction).

#2. Middle of action (Newtons 2nd Law)

a. After the inertia breaker you must continue the acceleration with a Booster. (Like a booster rocket, an extra aid, a second stager)

b. All body parts eg arms and legs, in any move be it a punch, block or kick, must always end up in a bent elbow or knee movement to enable a very quick change in any direction at any time.

#3. End of action

NOTE: ‘End’ of action should not be taken literally as one should never really stop action until the job is done. Our ‘end action’ has to be programmed to an interuppted continuity as if this stage is still the middle stage.

The Martialarm Combat Training Partner

In a martial arts career you can occationally get into a circumstance with no school to go to or no one to train with and so out of neccessity the martialarm solo training partner was manufactured out of an idea. The Martialarm is a Wu shu training machine used to develop the entry and trapping skills of any martial arts system. It is designed to put to the test any techniques so to improve the ability to trap and control your opponents hands and arms. This can be done because the Martialarm moves and reacts like a real opponent. The Martialarm moves and twists up, down, left and right just like a real opponent would – so it can spring forward and so will strike back!.

The Martialarm Combat Training Partner was tested and implemented on the following theories

Martialarm Theory

#1) Safety – You must maintain 100% safety when entering into the dangerous range, this means to limit any variables that could occur by covering them. (Ways of attack must be sophisticated yet simple, fast as well as safe!)

#2) Attack – You must have the ability to attack when you want, with no worry or problems. The attack should include a great handling of the opponents weapons. (Attacks must be structured to have within them a 100% defense!)

#3) The ability to change and – Techniques, attacks and defenses must flow but not necessarily at a constant pace. The ability to change and to choose what’s next is very important!

Martialarm Martial Developement of Power

Most Chinese styles use a calm approach to power development. We try to keep unnecessary muscles from being involved in the technique, in order to avoid inhibiting the prime movers behind a certain technique from achieving its result. Essentially, a straight punch is a triceps-driven technique and the Chinese style of punching allows the triceps to do its job without the inhibition of significant biceps involvement in this punch.

Most other techniques can be viewed in a similar fashion – you have muscles which are vital to the effective execution of a technique and muscles which can be not, or which are even counter-productive when involved in that technique. No matter which martial arts style you do, try to avoid unnecessary muscle involvement.

Many Chinese styles use more “follow-through” in their techniques and achieve their power by driving the entire body weight through a target zone at speed. The arm is totally relaxed until contact is made and the body is still driving deeper into the target when attention is brought to the technique using a trigger.

The body has more inertia to overcome before it can move with the descending line of force and, as a result, the power is more completely absorbed by the body rather than being partially dissipated by the body moving more freely with the punch, as with a horizontal line of force.

Martialarm Combat systems Weapons

The Martialarm System uses quite a large array of natural body weapons, a few of them fairly specialised. The main ones are:

? Fist Strikes. (Sun Fist, Dragon Head, Phoenix Eye and Leopard Paw)

? Palm Strikes. (Tile Shattering, Yin/Yang, Wil?low Leaf and Hurricane Palm).

? Finger Strikes. (Flying Fingers, Immortal Pointing the Way, Twin Dragons, Tiger Claw, Eagle Claw, Dragon Claw, Rat Claw and Crab Claw).

? Back Fist Strike. (These tend to be follow?through rather than the ‘snap’ versions).

? Bottom Fist Strike. (Iron Hammer equates to the Japanese tettsui technique).

? Forearm Strikes. (This is used for smashing, sweeping blows of great power).

? Elbow Strikes. (This is generally used in a very flexible manner using multiple strikes).

? Shoulder Strikes. (Used for close-in work, of?ten to propel an opponent out into punch?ing range).

As you can see, there is an emphasis on tightly targetted use of a specialised hand formation in many cases. It is not enough merely to lash out in the hopes of an effective strike. In a ring situation, the “when in doubt, lash out” tactic may gain you points, but in the street it will be ineffective, unless you are lucky enough to impact on a vital point. A precise, surgi?cal strike or kick into one of your opponent’s vital or weak targets is needed and your combinations definately has to be structured with this in mind.

Martialarm System Technological Achievements

1. Revolutionised Martial arts thinking and design of “Formula Fighting” or “Martial Arts by Numbers” that allows pre-emptive attack – a much faster system than the conventional “Reactionary Response” to attack.

2. Development and pioneered Martial Science – a system which enables practitioner of all styles to evaluate and modify current technologies to improve efficiency and allow comparisons with proof of technologies, concepts and technologies.

3. Developed the following technologies –

a. Sightless combat
b. Smart weapons systems
c. Stealth weapons systems
d. Fire-and-forget systems
e. Broken rhythm energy
f. Plyometrics applications
g. U.F.O. motions
h. Counter error programs
i. Convert errors into attack
j. Selective automatic targetting

The Three Cs – Capability – Control – Confidence

Certainty in containing the opponent by a huge technological edge and a super tough body and mind.

1. Capabilities – Current fighting systems technologies have been transcended by great handling in that it is a martial science based on completely prooven concepts.

2. Control – Allows great handling of the opponents capabilities making him defensively impotent. Multi functional applications in everyday life as well as in self defense.

3. Confidence – The small, the unco-ordinated, the disabled and also the best and brightest will gain in self belief through this training.

Martial arm Martial Science Offers

Attack systems that cant be blocked. A shield that cant be breached. Body toughening, Formula fighting, Stealth and U.F.O weapons including the Nukes. Mind freeze technology that shuts the opponent down. 3Cs Capabilities and Control bring about Confidence.

Martial arm Martial Science Concepts

1. Traditional Fighting systems – Animal styles or based on kata and ritualised.

2. Acclectic Martial systems – Collection of what works for the individual into a new style.

3. Designer Martial arts – Only the usable of conscious mind, scientific and repeatable.

Similarities to Bruce Lee Jeet Kune Do

Simultaneous parrying & striking

When standing up to an incoming attack; the attack is parried or deflected and a counter attack is delivered at the same time. Not as advanced as a stop hit but more effective than blocking and counter attacking in order. This is also practiced by some Chinese martial arts.

Economy of motion

JKD students are told to waste no time or movement. When it comes to combat JKD practitioners believe the easiest things work best.

Be like water

Lee believed that martial systems should be as flexible as possible. He time and time again used water as an analogy to describe why flexibility is a desired trait in martial arts. Water is absolutely flexible. It can be seen through, but yet at other times it can obscure things from sight. It can split and go around things, rejoining on the other side, or it can crash through things. It can erode the hardest rocks by gently lapping away at them or it can flow past the tiniest pebble. Lee believed that a martial system should have these behaviours. JKD students reject traditional systems of training, fighting styles and the Confucian guidance used in traditional kung fu schools because of this lack of flexibility. JKD is is often said to be a dynamic concept that is forever changing, thus being extremely flexible. “Absorb what is useful; Disregard that which is useless” is an often quoted Bruce Lee maxim. JKD students are encouraged to study every form of combat available. This is believed to expand one’s knowledge of other fighting systems; to both add to one’s arsenal as well as to know how to defend against such tactics.

Stop hits / stop kicks

This means deflecting an opponent’s attack with an attack of your own instead of a simple block. JKD students believe that this is the most difficult defensive skill to develop. This strategic plan can be a feature of some traditional Chinese martial arts.

No high kicks

JKD practitioners conclude they should mark their kicks to their opponent’s shins, knees, thighs, and mid section. These targets are the closest to the foot, provide more stability and are more difficult to defend against. However, as with all other JKD principles nothing is “written in stone”. If a open area presents itself; even a target above the waist one could take advantage of the situation without feeling burdened by this principle.

The Martialarm Introduction To Hapkido

August 22, 2014 by  
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Hapkido practitioner becomes well-versed in many kicks, punches, and blocks. From Aiki-Jujitsu (the predecessor of Aikido) it gets most of its grappling techniques. Hence, the Hapkido practitioner spends an equated volume of time learning techniques such as throws and joint locks. The advantage of studying Hapkido versus studying one striking style and one grappling style is that the practitioner learns to use the two approaches to flatter one another. For example, a Hapkido artist would use a punch to disrupt her training partner while a challenging throw is set up. Conversely, a Hapkido performer can turn around or off-balance his opponent to decrease their knack to defend against a kick. Along these same lines, the Hapkido performer learns to counter in the opposite manner of an strike, hence mystifying the foe. As such, linear attacks are countered with a roundish technique and spherical attacks are countered with a linear technique. Hapkido artists furthermore become skilled at vital targets and pressure points in order to immobilise their attacker as fast as imaginable.

Hapkido – Very similar to traditional Hapkido, this contemporary version uses Muay Thai striking techniques as a replacement of getting its strikes.

Hapkido is a brand of self-defense that employs joint locks, pressure points, throws, kicks, and other strikes. Hapkido practitioners learn to counter the techniques of other martial arts as well as common “unskilled” attacks. There is also a range of traditional weapons including short stick, cane, rope, sword and staff which adjust in emphasis depending on the particular tradition examined.

Albeit hapkido consist of both long and close range fighting techniques, the objective of most engagements is to get near for a close punch, lock, or throw. Hapkido emphasizes spherical motion, non-resisting movements, and ownership of the adversary. Practitioners seek to get advantage by the use of footwork and body positioning to employ leverage, avoiding the use of strength against strength.

On the “hard-soft” scale of martial arts, hapkido stands everyplace in the center, employing “soft” techniques similar to jujitsu and aikido as well as “hard” techniques reminiscent of taekwondo and tangsoodo. Even the “hard” techniques, though, emphasize spherical rather than linear movements. Hapkido is an eclectic martial art, and different hapkido schools emphasize varied techniques. Then again, some core techniques are found in each school (kwan), and all techniques should follow the three principles of hapkido:

Right Hapkido tactics include using footwork and a series of kicks and hand strikes to bridge the distance with an foe. Afterward to instantaneously control the balance of the rival (naturally by manipulating the head and neck), for a take down or to isolate a wrist or arm and apply a joint twisting throw, depending upon the situation; Hapkido is a comprehensive system and as the rival’s balance has been taken, there are a myriad of techniques to disable and overcome the foe.

Hapkido endeavors to be a absolutely comprehensive fighting style and as such strives to keep away from narrow specialization in any particular variety of technique or range of fighting. It maintains a wide range of tactics for striking, standing jointlocks, throwing techniques (both pure and joint manipulating throws) and pinning techniques. some classes as well incorporate tactics for ground fighting notwithstanding these tactics readily tend to be focused upon escaping, controlling, striking and gouging tactics over submissions and emphasizing the capability to take one’s feet and situational awareness over pins.

Like most martial arts, hapkido employs a great number of punches and hand strikes, as well as elbow strikes. A distinctive example of hapkido hand techniques is “live hand” punch that focuses energy to the baek hwa hyul in the hand, causing energy strikes and internal strikes. The hand strikes are readily used to weaken the training partner ahead of joint locking and throwing, and additionally as finishing techniques. Hand striking in hapkido (unless in competition) is not localized to punches and open hand striking; some significance is given to striking with talons at the throat and eyes; pulling at the foe’s genitals is also covered in established training. in order to recall hand strikes more easily in an emotionally charged situation, beginning students are taught usual, effective routines of blocks and counterattacks called Makko Chigi, which results to more compound techniques as the student becomes familiar with them.

A good deal of of hapkido’s joint control techniques are cited to be derived largely From aikijujutsu. They are taught additionally to aikido techniques, but in general the circles are lesser and the techniques are applied in a more linear fashion. Hapkido’s joint manipulation techniques attack both large joints (such as the elbow, shoulder, neck, back, knee, and hip) and small joints (such as wrists, fingers, ankles, toes, jaw)

Wristlocks Hapkido is well accepted for its use of a wide variety of wristlocks. These techniques are believed to have been derived From Daito-ryu aikijujutsu even though their manner of performance is not always alike to that of the parent art. Still many of the tactics found in hapkido are quite similar to those of Daito-ryu and of aikido which was derived From that art. These involve such tactics as the supinating wristlock, pronating wristlock, internal rotational wristlock and the utilizing of pressure points on the wrist and are ordinary to many types of Japanese jujutsu, Chinese qin na and even ‘catch as catch can’ brawling.

Elbowlocks Even if well recognized for its wristlocking techniques hapkido has an equally wide range of tactics which centre upon the manipulation of the elbow joint (see armlocks). The first self defense technique typically taught in many hapkido schools is the knifehand elbow press. This technique is thought to be derived From Daito-ryu’s ippondori, a development of disarming and destroying the elbow joint of a sword wielding foe. Hapkido classically introduces this technique off a wrist grabbing strike where the defender makes a roundish movement with his hands to free themselves From their foe’s grasp and applies a pronating wristlock while cutting down upon the elbow joint with their forearm, taking their rival down to the ground where an elbow lock is administered with one’s hand or knee to immobolize the attacker in a pin. Interestingly both Daito-ryu and aikido opt for to use handpressure on the elbow during the technique rather than using the forearm as a ‘hand blade’, cutting the into elbow joint, in the hapkido manner.

Hapkido training can be realized in any city in the world and I encourage you to visit out martial arts directory of Hapkido to find a school near you!

The Martialarm Introduction To Choy-Li-Fut

August 22, 2014 by  
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The Martialarm Introduction To Choy-Li-Fut

Choy-Li-Fut is a popular Southern variety of kung-fu in which the opponents oppose from some distance, which necessitate of each the proficient and expert development of long-hand abilities, as well as firm and solid grouning in the body, though the feet must be versatile. The arms are wielded freely and powerfully in a variety of styles: uppercuts, backfists, roundhouses, and overhead foreknuckle thrusts. The Baat Gaw land, willow leaf double swords, and 18 staff can be used in the aggressive kung-fu variety.

As a Southern Shaolin style with Five Animal techniques, Hung Kuen is a close relative of Choi Lei Fut and is said by some Choi Lei Fut branches to be the variety that Chan Yuen-Wu taught founder Chan Heung.

Choi Lei Fut is a characterized as a “soft-hard”, “external” variety. The curriculum was designed so that anti-Qing rebels may perhaps concisely gain feasible proficiency and still incorporates a wide range of weapons. Several frequent movements have specific sounds interrelated with them for example, “sik” when throwing punches, “yik” when punching from horse riding stance, “wah” was used when using a Tiger Claw and “dik” when kicking hypothetically so that friendly forces may perhaps recognize each other in battle and to force the practitioner to coordinate his breathing habits with his movements.

Choy Lay Fut training could be done in any city in the world and I call you to visit out martial arts directory of Choy Lay Fut to find a school near you!

Depending on the branch of Choi Lei Fut, Choi Fook is said to have been a master either of Southern Shaolin Kung Fu from Fujian province, he was not related to which was started by Choi Gau-Yee and is cited to have the longest range of the five major family styles of the southern Chinese martial arts.

Lei Yau-San, cited to be a student of Jee Sin while others admit him to be a student of Li Sik Hoi-one of the 5 Ancestors of the Hung Mun, Lei Yau-San is known not only as a teacher of Chan Heung, and lately discovered of Jeung Hung Sing as well, but as the founder of Lei Ga which, like Choi Ga, is one of the five major family styles of the southern Chinese martial arts.

Fut Ga literally “Buddha family,” specializes in palm techniques and for this reason is also known as Buddha family Palm, Buddhist Palm, or Buddha Palm. Monk Ching Cho Woh Seung was responsible for spreading the Fut Ga procedure all over Guandong. Both the left and apt hand are used in attack and defense. Long and short-range footwork is employed.

The Martialarm Intro To Chow-Gar Kung Fu

August 22, 2014 by  
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The Martialarm Introduction To Chow-Gar

Chow-Gar style is from Southern China. It was instituted by Chow Lung, who learned hung-gar, one of the five quintessential southern systems originating in the Shao-lin temple, from his uncle who added the pa-kua staff maneuvers to his nephew’s training prior to passing away. The Choy style was taught to him by Choy-Kau. Subsequently, after a three-year residence at the temples he exposed his own school in Canton. in 1915 Gen. Lee-Fook-Lam appointed Chow-Lung an instructor in the Chinese army.

Chow Gar is a short range fighting process from the Southern Shaolin, and is a form of Southern Praying Mantis, which is one of a number of Chinese martial arts. It is an frightening style with emphasis on close range fighting. These attainments are developed by utilizing a range of training techniques a.k.a chongs and gungs, which have been advanced over several centuries.

The Basic Movements of Chow Gar

There are also 20 basic movements consisting of one or 3 moves, these are known as San Sau. they are;

* Bow Chong (cover hand, meaning to wrap up)
* Gau Choi (hammer fist to come down)
* Cye Sau (deflect)
* Doa Sau (spring hand)
* Narp Sau (hook hand)
* Got sau (cut back hand)
* Saw Sau (lock hand)
* Chum Chung sau (sinking elbow hand)
* Yong Sau (upward reach hand)
* Chuen sau (Transmit hand)
* Larp sau (snatch hand)
* Mut sau (sweep hand)
* Kum la Ja Jook (seize and hold hand)
* Kwor sau (circle over hand)
* Yui Sau (Shake off hand)
* Pai Kui (slicing hand)
* Cheet Jeung (cutting palm)
* Lau Sau (Leaking hand)
* Dun Chung (back elbow)
* Ngai Chung (Forward elbow)
* Jin Sau (scissor hand)
There are 16 more.

Chow Gar forms

There are a lot of different forms in the Chow Gar system, these are a handful of the one most ordinarily taught:

* Sarm Bo Jin (3 step arrow)
* Gau Si Mun sau (9 seeking hands)
* Mo Ying Sau Chor Kui (crack the bridge)
* Bo Sim Sau (searching insect hand)
* Gen Tung Gen Sau Lin Wa say (fright power hand)
* Poon loong keok (flying dragon leg)
* Yau Loong Sau (swimming dragon hands)
* say Mun Sau (four gates hand)
* Bic Saan (lifting mountain)

The founder of the Chow Gar Praying Mantis martial art was Chow Ah Naam. He had spent many years in the Shaolin Monastery (Sil Lum Jee) harnessing the bodies hidden powers, through the Shaolin secret training drills. These special skills and methods were bestowed upon individuals that showed tremendous martial skill and intuition, and Chow Ah Naam was one of those rare individuals. Because of his incredible skill, the hall of Shaolin was given to him to teach this elite art.

The short-range power that he had harnessed easily overcame the other Shaolin arts, and the name praying mantis was given to the system, after seeing a praying mantis fight off a blackbird with sudden movements, which was reminiscent of Chow Ah Naam’s shock-like power.

Chow Gar training can be done in any city in the world and I call you to visit out martial arts directory of Chow Gar to find a school near you!

The Martialarm Intro To Capoeira

August 22, 2014 by  
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The Martialarm Introduction To Capoeira

Capoeira is an Afro-Brazilian martial art, game, and culture created by enslaved Africans in Brazil during the 17th Century. Participants form a roda (circle) and take turns playing instruments, singing, and sparring in pairs in the center of the circle. The game is marked by fluid acrobatic play, feints, subterfuge, and extensive use of groundwork, as well as sweeps, kicks, and headbutts. Throughout the game, a player must avoid a sweep, trip, kick, or head butt that may knock him or her on the floor. Less frequently-used techniques include elbow-strikes, slaps, punches, and body-throws. Capoeira has three variations known as “Capoeira Angola”, “Capoeira Regional”, and the ever-evolving “Capoeira Contemporânea”.

From the 16th to the 19th centuries, Portugal shipped slaves into South America from western Africa. The South American country of Brazil was the most common destination for African captives[citation needed] with 42% of all enslaved peoples shipped across the Atlantic. Most commonly sold into Brazil were Akan, Igbo, Yoruba, Dahomean, Muslim Guineans, Hausa, and Bantu (among them Kongos, Kimbundas and Kasanjes) from Angola, Congo and Mozambique.

These Africans brought their cultural traditions and religions with them to the New World. One theory suggests that capoeira originated from a fern courtship dance[citation needed] in Angola used by suitors of young women, however, this is only one of many disputed theories. There is contention as to whether the game arrived with enslaved Africans or whether Africans refined a preexisting Brazilian game. One catalyst for capoeira was the homogenization of African people under the oppression of slavery. Capoeira emerged as a way to resist oppression, secretly practice art, transmit culture, and lift spirits. Some historians believe that the indigenous peoples of Brazil also played an important role in the development of capoeira.

Capoeira was advanced by Brazilian slaves of African descent (presumably admitted from the Portuguese colony of Angola) some time in the 16th century. since it was illegal for slaves to practice fighting skills, they varied native African spiritual dances so that each time they practised their art they might appear to merely be dancing. Due to the fact these dances included manoeuvres such as handstands, back flips, and cartwheels, Capoeira is today the most energetic of all martial arts, with many kicks being executed from a handstand position. Its offensive techniques are initially kicks, its defensive techniques are in the beginning body movements which stay away from the enemy’s attack all together. African culture is a large part of studying Capoeira, above all since training and competition is done to the rhythm of the berimbau, a single- stringed musical instrument. Only in the 20th century has the practice of Capoeira become legal in Brazil, and Only in very modern years has it been taught in other countries.

In 1942, Mestre Pastinha opened the first formal academy for instruction in the traditional form of the art, known as capoeira Angola. Mestre Pastinha’s efforts prevented capoeira Angola from being lost as newer, modernized forms of the art gained popularity.

This era was a milestone of a dramatic change in the mode of instruction of the art of capoeira. Previously, capoeira was passed on in secret, usually from a relative such as one’s father or uncle, or in a small group setting where several young people in a particular community would receive guidance from elder practitioners from that community. During this era, the academy system became the predominant form of participation in the art. Presently, there are capoeira academies on almost every continent of the world.

Another significant change that occurred due to the proliferation of capoeira ‘schools’ is the participation of middle and upper class members of the population. Presently, some Mestres participate in seminars where they discuss the need to make the art available to poor blacks who can not afford the cost of training in an academy. This is an issue of concern to practitioners who recognize the importance of making the art available to people who come from the culture that invented the art in the first place.

Capoeira training can be done in any city in the world and I encourage you to visit out martial arts directory of Capoeira to find a school near you!

The Martialarm Intro To Arnis

August 22, 2014 by  
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Arnis and Escrima are clearly the same martial art as Kali, the diverse names signify which part of The Philippines the art comes from and a handful minor variations of technique. Kali is unusual in that it teaches students stick fighting first and then open handed fighting as its open hand techniques are based on its stick fighting techniques. Kali is thus ordinarily perceived as a stick fighting style, but unarmed combat is given equal emphasis. Most of the unarmed techniques are batters, but leg and hip techniques to off-balance or throw an opponent are also used. The Spanish Espada y Daga was took into Kali, and thus many schools will also train sword and knife techniques. Similar Sorts: Kalari Payat – This Indian style teaches supplementary weapons than Kali, but open hand, knife, stick, and sword are foremost. Thaing (Bando) – A style from Burma (now Myanmar) in which knife fighting is emphasised but stick, sword and open hand are also taught.

The oldest martial arts in the Philippines were those practiced by the indigenous Filipinos. They were in contact with the aborigines of Taiwan and Borneo which is evident from oral legends and the similarities between their fighting styles. The native tribes focused on combat with sticks, cudgels, knives and broadswords while practicing unarmed combat forms like dumog.

The Filipinos’ battle-tested tactics proved strategically effective from angle of old world weaponry and hand to hand conflict. Highly skilled Filipino martial artists are often characterized by a state of “flow” that is decisively responsive, deployable, agile, versatile, lethal, survivable, and sustainable.

Escrima training might be done in any city in the world and I encourage you to visit out martial arts directory of Escrima to find a school near you!